ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

AncientEconomic Activies. Thepeople of Oyan were and are still predominantly farmers. The popular food crops from Oyan are potatoe, yam, cassava, corn, millet.cash crops grown in limited quantity include cocoa, kola nut and palm products. Apart from farming, some male folks also engaged in the fabrication of farming tools, guns for hunting animals, basket weaving and general blacksmithing and plamwine production.  Females on their own part used to assist in harvesting farm products, converying and selling same in the markets. They also engaged in production of garri, (cassava grains) lafun, (cassava flour) and elubo, (yamflour). The more enterprising ones among themused to twine cotton wools into threads for weaving cloth process palm oil and palm kernel oil.

Advent of Modern day Economic Activies. After the First World War, many Oyan indigenes found their way to Gold Coast (now Ghana) and engaged in trading, diamond and gold mining.the resources for the early rapid economic development of Oyan in the 1930s and 1940s came from these indigenes and this led to various business activities in the town.

 

Money Lending (Iwofa System). This was one of the businesses that thrived in the 1950s. this involved the giving of loan under very strict conditions that virtually enslaved the beneficiaries.somtim human or material collateral were involved.this exploitatative business continued until Chief Theophilus Adeyemi (a.k.a. Babaloja) of Ojomu Compound came on the scene and started lending money to the needy without any form ofbondage or collateral except that beneficiars would work on his farms forsalaries which were used to offset the loan.

Motor Transport. Business started in the early 1950s when Mr. Samuel Ibikunle of Agara Compound and Mr. Samuel Dada  of Sobaloju Compound teamed up to buy and operate a boarded vehicle to ply Oyan-Osogbo route.Messrs Ibraimo and Akintola followed suit and used their vehicle to ply Oyan- Gold  Coast route (nowGhana),Mr. Joseph Adeosun of OlaCompound became the first owner driver of a commercial vehicle in Oyan in 1952AD.also, Messrs Emanuel Anwo ofIkolaba Compound and Sunday Adeyemo  were involved in motor transportation to Gold Coast (now Ghana).

Small Retail Shops stated opening up in the 1940s for the sale of household items, provisions and books.Chifs Theophilus Adeyemi of Ojomu Compound played a leading role in commercial activities with his shop that used to sell essential items and books at avoiding prices. He was joined in the commercial business by Mr. Joseph Oyeleke of Oloya Compound, Mejowuoye of Aade Compound, Mr. Joshua Aderibigbe of Ikolaba Compound and Mrs Asunmowu Gogo of Eleweodan Compound, who are textile dealers.

Photography and Printing Press came on board with Mr. James Oyewole Ajayi, a native of Ila Odo who schooled and lived in Oyan as a teacher and a secretary of Egbe Omo Ilu. He ventured into photography to become the first professional photographer in Oyan in 1949. He founded Areilaodo Compound in Oyan. Mr. Mustafa Olarenwaju Adegoke of Onile Compound had a stint with photography for sometime before opting out to be trained as a Dispensary Attendant in 1952. There was only one notable printing press established in 1953 by Mr. Adebayo Fadele of Obitikun compound. He was popularly known as Sobalaje Printing Press.

Infrastructures. In order to boost economic activities in Oyan, Konta Ijabe Road was constructed in1945AD. The road was tarred in 1961AD and later on reconstructed extended to Ila Orangun with thick asphalt overlay in 2001AD. A postal agency that had Mr. Jeayinfa of Oluawo Compound as Mail Runner served Oyan since 1940s before a standard post office which was manned by Mr. Hezekiah Omogoye of Ojomu Compound, as post master, was established in 1955. The post office was later upgraded to a Departmental Post Office in 1962AD. Portable water system was commissioned in 1962AD. The town was connected to the national grid for electricity supply in 1978AD. A Police post was established in 1963AD. To promote agricultural activities in Oyan, the state Government established an Agricultural Center on piece of land donated by the Adegoke and Adebiyi families of Onile Compound in 1968AD. In the area of financing, Adebayo Credit Society was established through the efforts of some indigenes who were repatriated from Ghana in 1971AD. United Bank for Africa opened a branch in the town in 1982AD followed by Oyan Community Bank 1992AD.

Industry. Many spirited indigenes tried to industrialize the town by setting up small scale industries. Notable among them were Blenders Vegetable Oil Factory established in 1986 by Engr. Francis Adebo
Adegoke
of Onile Compound, Saw Mill by Hon. Chief Barr. Joseph Aderanti Alabi of  Elemoso Compound, Wood Milling Workshop by Chief Tijani Omotosho of Aogun Compound and Mr. Ebun Toye of  Oloya Compound, medium scale poultry farm by Mr. Jacob Oye Adejumo of  Onile Compound while Alhaji Sanusi Dere of Awo Compound and Chief Theophilus Adeyemi of Ojomu Compound established small scale petrol stations in 1978AD and 1982AD respectively. Alhaji Chief Abubakar Lawal of Oparin Compound established established a medium scale petrol station in 2012AD. Alhaji Sanusi Dere also established a medium scale hotel named Owode Hotel in the early 1980s.Alhaji Fadiji of Sobaloju Compound also established a small scale bakery.

Job Creation.The modest industrialization of the town provided a lot of jobs for the indigenes. Many became self employed as bricklayers, mason, carpenters, electricians, plumbers, block moders, welders, tailors, vulcanizers, hair dresses, and motor mechanics among others. Many small retail stores opened up for sales of provisions, soft and alcoholic drinks while farm produce, and other commercial items were traded in open market every five days. This led to establishment of trade unions. Prominent among them were (1) Bricklayers Association, (2) Carpenters Association (3) Tailors Association (4) Patent Medicine Association (5) Road Transportation Workers Union (6) Plank Sellers Association (7) Meat Sellers Association (10) Motor Bike Riders Association (12) Palm Oil sellers Association.